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Conrad Emery and His Descendants



I have switched this from a PAF (Personal Ancestral File) generated pages to the TNG (The Next Generation of Genealogy Sitebuilding) program - this offers alot more advantages - the #1 being that I can enter any new information into this program and it will be instantly available over the internet without having to re-generate webpages thus even a single piece of infromation such as a spelling error or addition of a single date will be available instantly. It also allows me a way to hopefully clean up my old PAF progams which have sufferd much over the years with bouts of computers problems. I hope this will allow me to move on forward - save time and possibly go back to the PAF if I wish - its been a battle to keep up - and it takes time to generate pages in PAF and re-formate them for the site - which is not justified with minor changes.

The surname page of Conrad Emery and his descendants. and this is the opening page of the file startng with Conrad Emery b. Germany; the main statistics - page

There has been some issues with the database and site the past couple of months and the server site has had to be changed - so I am going to replace the old version of PAF on here just in case it does go down = this is several years old and this is not up-to-date. I have been entering the corrections into the TNG because it is instant change when you send them to me and then into my paf files for my permentant files I am trulely sorry of any trouble this has caused.

This is an entirely different branch of Emery's, German out of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, they spread into Ohio, Indiana and Illionis and other points west. I obtained the book and have been in the process of updating it also.

Per Frederic B. Emery, M.D., Conrad Emery and His Decensdants published in 1970:
In the year 1705 a number of German people belonging to the Reformed Church, residing bewteen the cities of Wolfenb├╝ttel and Halberstadt, fled because of religeous persecution, first to Neuwied in Rhenish Prussia, then to Holland. Two Years later, in the year 1707, they embarked for New York. But adverse winds carried their ship into Delaware Bay, so they set out from Phiadelphia for New York over the Old York Road from New Hope, determined to reach the banks of the Hudson, their final destination. However, when they reached the Rockaway area (Lebanon was orginally called Rockaway) they were so impressed with the appearance of the country that they abandoned their orginal intentions and decided to establish themselves in this region instead. From these people and their descendants, Germantown and German Valley derived their names. German Reformed Churches were established at German Village, Foxhill, New Germantown, Stillwater, Newton and Lebanon. ALl except Lebanon ultimately became Presbyterian. The latter became a Dutch Reformed Church when it untied with the church at Whitehouse in 1813.

It is possible that Conrad Emery (or Conrod H├╝mmerich as the name often appeared in the early records) Was one of these emigrant Germans, or he may have come later and settled in this vicinty to be with his countrymen. Thr first record we have of his presence in this country was July 8, 1730, when he was naturalized by an act of the New Jersey Assembly entiled "An Act for the better enabling divers Inhabitants of the Province of New Jersey to hold Lands, and invest them with priviledges of natural born Subjects of the said Province". Among the rather large list of emigrants to be granted the privilege of citizenship by this act appears the name Koenraet Henerigh. ANd since he would necessarily have been at least twenty-one years of age at that time, his dater of birth must have been on or before 1709.

The early baptismal records of the Emery family in New Jersey carry the Germanic spelling of the name: Humerich, Humrich, Hummerich, and Hemmerich. It also appears in midifications such as Emerich, Himry, Hemry, Emry and even Henry. But eventually the name became everywhere in Hunterdon county in its present and general form, Emery.

On April 15, 1752, Conrad Emery purchased 147 acres of land in Readington Township, Hunterdon county, N.J., from Jospeh Kirkbride. At that time Readington Township comprised all the land laying between the north and south branches of the Raritan RIver; that is, all the land now included in the townships of Tewksbuty, Clinton and Readington. Kirkbride owned the land in the southerly part of this territory, so the orginal homestead tract was probably located in the southern part of Readington Towhsip, or in the present Clinton Township. The farm was supposedly sold by the rest of the children to their brother, John Emery, on December 29, 1790.

This was orginialy by, Frederick B. Emery, M.D. His version was in outline and paragraph form; no real numbering system and was very hard to follow. And it was no generational from Conrad only from his children by chapters under each. There is documentation for some of the material. I pulled all the addresses that were in it because I feel should not be on the website. I forgot that I followed his format in the documentation also.

If there are any corrections you can send to me in any form and I will make them. Documentation would be appreciated. His was mainly just a list of books at the end of a family paragraph. Gedcom would me very acceptable means of updating this file.

As I work on this I will change any errors in the orignial Personal Ancestral File data base I made and from sources and material already given to me. I placed the data into PAF it as a means to have an easy method to make it into generational form and a have a numering system and produce it out in book form that was easy to follow and work with and an index. I have no idea how large this can get before it starts to balk and not make a book form - but we may find out - or I hope so

Sorry for any errors. This was done several years ago in between computer break downs and lockups. Hopefully I can get back into this more.






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